There are plenty of big, official steps to take when setting up your new Dutch home. But what about your daily life in the Netherlands? How do the Dutch manage their households? And who will look after the dog when you are at work? The answers lie here.

There are some fundamental homemaking tasks you will need to get out of the way as soon as possible, and what can you do without the internet? Find out about ‘getting connected in the Netherlands‘ here. Once your online, you might still be worried about having to forgo your precious evening television time because you do not speak Dutch. Panic not: all forms of ‘the media in the Netherlands‘ are offered in a wide variety of different languages.

Stocking up your store cupboards will also be a priority. There are many different places to go ‘shopping in the Netherlands‘, which you can read about on our site. A trip to the local market is a great opportunity to sample and learn about ‘Dutch food‘. This article will get your mouth watering for bitterballen and stroopwafles. After a few days of enjoying these Dutch culinary delights you will need to take out your trash. Get the lowdown on ‘recycling and waste management in the Netherlands‘ here. If you just do not have the time, why not consider getting some ‘household help in the Netherlands‘? Look through this section to see what is on offer and how much it will cost you.

Are you intrigued by your new neighbours’ pristine and beautiful window display? Learn about the Dutch attitude towards ‘gardens and curtains‘, and how they are maintained. It is highly likely that your street will be safe to walk down at all hours, but it is still worth your while reading up on ‘safety in the Netherlands‘, so that you are prepared for any scenario and can feel secure in your new home.

Do you feel that your daily life is still missing one last, furry thing? Learn about keeping and caring for ‘pets in the Netherlands‘ here.

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